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Discourse Analysis by Gillian Brown & George Yule


Teaching ‘listening’ as an English Language Skill

Introduction:

English as a foreign language has the greatest motion in Bangladesh. Status of English as the “library language” and the increased “international inter-dependence” are the two reasons of this which led to a greater focus on face-to-face language usage crossing the margin of pen and paper exercise. As the decline of Grammar-Translation method in 1960s proved that language learning might not be limited to “reading and writing” or ‘literacy’, the provisional continuation of Direct Method confirmed too that ‘listening and speaking’ that is ‘oracy’ is not all that is language. Language must be taught in an integrative way where all four skills are focused.

But most often, even in the modern methods of SL teaching, quite surprisingly, listening skill is ignored in a way or another! David Nunan (1997) commented that listening is the “Cinderella Skill” which is overlooked by its elder sister “speaking” in SL learning. As ‘to expertise the productive skills like speaking and writing’ has become the standard of the knowledge of second language, listening and reading have been turned to be the secondary ones. Besides, in our schools, colleges and even in the higher levels, instructors direct how to read and write, not how to speak or listen. It is believed that these would be mastered by the learners automatically. Although listening had a boost up in 1960s (direct method) and in 1980s (Krashen’s input hypothesis, 1981; James Asher’s Total physical response, 1988 and Gillian Brown, 1988), it turned a fashion in most cases!

In this article, I have tried to show how listening helps EFL learners to develop language skill. Despite the fact that it is not a research article, a small scale survey has been done at Noakhali Science and Technology University, Bangladesh in order to demonstrate that listening practice is insisted by the learners and they find it functional in language learning.

What is listening?

Listening is a skill in a sense that it’s a related but distinct process than hearing which involves merely perceiving sound in a passive way while listening occupies an active and immediate analysis of the streams of sounds. This correlation is like that between seeing and reading. Seeing is a very ordinary and passive state while reading is a focused process requiring reader’s instrumental approach. Listening has a “volitional component”. Tomatis’ (2007) view is, while listening; the desire to listen, as well as the capability to listen (comprehension) must be present with the listener for the successful recognition and analysis of the sound.

What ‘listening’ really means is ‘listening and understanding what we hear at the same time’. So, two concurrent actions are demanded to take place in this process. Besides, according to Mecheal Rost (1991), listening comprises some component skills which are:

• discriminating between sounds,

• recognizing words,

• identifying grammatical groupings of words,

• identifying expressions and sets of utterances that act to create meaning,

• connecting linguistic cues to non-linguistic and paralinguistic cues,

• using background knowledge to predict and later to confirm meaning and recalling important words and ides.

As McDonough and Shaw ( 1993) and Rost (1991) explain that a listener as a processor of language has to go through three processes using three types of skills:

a. Processing sound/ Perception skills: As the complete perception doesn’t emerge from only the source of sound, listeners segment the stream of sound and detect word boundaries, contracted forms, vocabulary, sentence and clause boundaries, stress on longer words and effect on the rest of the words, the significance of intonation and other language-related features, changes in pitch, tone and speed of delivery, word order pattern, grammatical word classes, key words, basic syntactic patterns, cohesive devices etc.

b. Processing meaning/ Analysis skills:

It’s a very important stage in the sense, as researches show, that syntax is lost to memory within a very short time whereas meaning is retained for much longer. Richards (1985:191) says that, ‘memory works with propositions, not with sentences’. While listening, listeners categorize the received speech into meaningful sections, identify redundant material, keep hold of chunks of the sentences, think ahead and use language data to anticipate what a speaker may be going to say, accumulate information in the memory by organizing them and avoid too much immediate detail.

c. Processing knowledge and context/ Synthesis skills:

Here, ‘context’ refers to physical setting, the number of listener and speakers, their roles and their relationship to each other while ‘linguistic knowledge’ refers to their knowledge of the target language brought to the listening experience. Every context has its individual frame of reference, social attitude and topics. So, members of a particular culture have particular rules of spoken behavior and particular topic which instigate particular understanding. Listening is thought as ‘interplay’ between language and brain which requires the “activation of contextual information and previous knowledge” where listeners guess, organize and confirm meaning from the context.

However, none of these micro-skills is either used or effective in isolation or is called listening. Successful listening refers to ‘the integration of these component skills’ and listening is nothing but the ‘coordination of the component skills’.

Nature of listening as a skill:

Besides the division of the skills as ‘receptive’ and ‘productive’, another subdivision focuses on ‘one-way reception’ and ‘interactive reception’ in this age of active learning. Reading and writing are one-way skills where learners don’t get direct feedback. But in speaking and listening, learners may have their understanding and reproduction checked instantly. Thus active and self-learning takes place.

Moreover, there is a traditional labeling for reading and listening as “passive” skills. But linguists believe that a listener is involved in guessing, anticipating, checking, interpreting, interacting and organizing by associating and accommodating their prior knowledge of meaning and form. Rost (1990) thinks, listeners “co-author” the discourse and they construct it by their responses.

Even as a receptive skill, listening differs greatly with reading as reading materials are printed and permanent enough where the learners are required to interact with the next sentence using the knowledge of the previous one while listening involves continuous material presentation where they have to respond to the immediate expression. From the view point of “product” or “process”, listening is more a process than a product which instantly shapes the understanding and utterances of the learners.

Why listening?

No doubt, listening is the most common communicative activity in daily life. according to Morley (1991, p.82), “We can expect to listen twice as much as we speak, four times more than we read, and five times more than we write.”

So, listening, as a skill, is assuming more and more weight in SL or FL classrooms than ever before. Rost (1994, p. 141-142), points out, “listening is vital in the language classroom because it provides input for the learner. Without understanding input at the right level, any learning simply cannot begin. Listening is thus fundamental to speaking.”

Limited listening input fails to promote face-to-face communication by shaping their social development, confidence and self-image. Adequate listening practice could give the learners essential contact with handy input that might trigger their utterances. Teacher talk or peer- interaction might be the options for this. But according to Rod Ellis (1990), it’s not only the exposure to L2 that is enough, and learners need L2 data suited to the accurate stage of their development. If the learners don’t have “optimal” exposure in the target language, they can’t transmit the “comprehensible input” into “intake” through “production strategies” where learners attempt to use L2 knowledge. Krashen’s (1981) view is that “acquisition” takes place as a result of the learner having understood input that is a little beyond the current level of his competence that is ‘the i+1 level’. We must take into account that the level of listening input must be higher than the level of language production of the target learners. So, language teaching pedagogy must incorporate academic and designed listening practice.

Obviously listening influences other skills. A theory of Tomatis shows that “the quality of an individual’s listening ability will affect the quality of both their spoken and written language development”. He also views that if the sounds of the target language are presented to the learners before presenting them in written form, the ease with which they integrate those sound will be reflected in their understanding and production of the language. However, a pre-exposure or a following-exposure to listening input is a must on the part of a learner.

It is widely known that individual’s ability to process and analyze the sounds influence their ability to translate the sounds of language into their written form. We know, reading is not only a visual process rather involves the rapid analysis of letters and words that represents sounds and it is sound which gives the words meaning. A learner can decode the graphic images or recognize their meaning efficiently if their auditory processing skills are well developed. In a similar way, sounds are translated into graphic form in writing and if the sounds are poorly integrated their graphic representation will be hampered and problems like spelling mistakes may arise. So, we see the foundation on which reading and writing skills are built is spoken language again listening is the fundamental to spoken language as without listening anything we can’t reproduce or reply.

In a learner-centered approach, it is deducted that listening provides the learners with the following features of the target language:

• How the language is organized

• How native speakers use the language

• How to communicate in the language

Strategies for Listening:

Two types of strategies for listening have been in practice. They are defined so according to the ways of processing the text while listening:

a. In Bottom up processing, like reading, learners utilize their linguistic knowledge to identify linguistic elements in an order from the smallest linguistic unit like phonemes (bottom) to the largest one like complete texts (top). They link the smaller units of the language together to form the larger parts and it’s a linear process where meaning is derived automatically at the last stage. It is absolutely “text based” process where learners rely on the sounds, words and grammar in the message in order to create meaning.

b. Top- down interpretation, on the other hand, requires learners to go to the listening with their prior knowledge of topic, context, and type of text as well as knowledge of language to reconstruct the meaning using the sounds as clues. “This back ground knowledge activates a set of expectations that help the listener to interpret what is heard and anticipate what will come next.”

It is assumed that bottom up process is applied while practicing minimal pairs, taking pronunciation tests, listening for specific details, recognizing cognates and word-order pattern but top-down interpretation is used in the activities like listening for the main idea, predicting, drawing inferences, and summarizing where learners relate what they know and what they hear through listening comprehension.



According to the types of situation where the understanding takes place, listening is divided into:

a. Reciprocal or interactive Listening where the listener is required to take part in the interaction and alternately listens and speaks. Interactive listening situations include face-to-face conversations and telephone calls in which listener has a chance to ask for clarification, repetition, or slower speech from conversation partner.

b. Non-reciprocal or non-interactive Listening where the listener is engaged in listening passively to a monologue or speech or even conversation. Some non-interactive listening situations are listening to the radio, CDs, TV, films, lectures etc. and here listener usually doesn’t have the opportunity to ask for clarification, slower speech or repetition.

We believe, this type of listening is not totally non- interactive too. The interaction takes place here is the ‘cognitive’ one where students respond through understanding and creating the meaning. On the other hand, this might be turn to semi- reciprocal if the instructor makes them responding while checking their understanding through question-answer or discussion and clarification in the class or lab.

Methodology:

Methods applied for the survey included questionnaire and group interviews taken with 40 students who attend listening classes in the language lab regularly and it has been observed by the author that they do better in speaking and reading than others. The subjects are the students of 1st year 1st term from the department of Pharmacy and CSTE, ACCT, and FIMS. Although they are really not beginners and have learnt English at their secondary and higher secondary level, they have no exposure to authentic English speaking and listening. Here they have been practicing listening in a language lab using headphone using audio and video for three months. The purpose of the survey was convincingly explained to them and they took 30 minutes to think on the questions and to answer them.

Findings:

30 students claim that listening practice has raised their confidence by throwing away their fear, hesitations, inertia and shyness that they had before to speak in English.

• All of the 40 students have told that watching video clippings and movie while listening enables to identify the right responses, styles, expressions, behaviors, attitudes and emotions in particular situations through concentrating on gesture, body language, non- linguistic cues, planning utterances, adjacency pairs, turn-taking, repairing utterances by asking for repetition, pre-closing and closing.

• 5 students have said that it has quickened their planning to respond as they listen to faster speaking than their own.

• 35 students opine that exposure to naturally spoken input by native speakers gives them practical experience of using language in target situations.

• 20 students who are highly motivated have found a change in their speaking style.

• 36 students think that listening to dialogues and conversation enriches their vocabulary and teaches how to use them appropriately.

• 10 students have found that intensive listening practice helps to remember the syntactic structures, spelling, accent and intonation.

• 19 students mention about learning of the cultures, feelings, reactions, trend and customs of the English speaking people that helps them feel motivated (integrative) to speak English.

• All of the 40 students opine that watching movie or video clippings draws more attention during the class and add to their learning.

• All of the 40 students believe that interaction with teachers for assessment or other purposes while listening help them greatly to remove confusion and use their newly gained knowledge immediately and make it regular in use.



Teaching listening:

Unfortunately, as I find a very diminutive effort in teaching listening in our country, this discussion may appear too much redundant to read to the language teachers! What we find in a traditional EFL classroom? Most of the classes complete their Language course without practice listening even for a day! Very few ELT trained teachers, now-a-days, in line with the flow of CLT; efforts for listening practice consisted of teacher reading aloud a written text slowly, once or more so that it is understood and than asking some comprehension questions. It seems the objective here is ‘to present the written language in an alternative way’ where characteristics of naturally spoken language is totally absent and listening practice is farther beyond. If the materials used for listening class comply with that in speaking class, it will, certainly, give a fully fledged input to the learners.

Teaching listening requires a bit more on the part of the teacher than that of the learners. One of the main principle of teaching listening, as I believe, should be “ Language material intended to used for training listening comprehension should never be presented visually first.” Good listening lessons go beyond the main listening task itself with related activities before and after the listening. The format may be like the following:

a. Pre-listening Stage: Some activities before listening may serve as preparation or warm-up for listening in several ways. These function as ‘reference’ and ‘framework’ by giving prior knowledge of listening activities. Some recommended per-listening activities include:

a. Introducing the topic and assessing their background knowledge of the topic or content of the material through commenting on a picture or photograph.

b. Activating their existing knowledge through discussion. Reading through comprehension questions in advance, working out own opinion on a topic, predicting content from the title etc. can be done.

c. Clarifying any necessary contextual information and vocabulary to comprehend the text. In this regard showing pictures maps or graphs and may be helpful.

d. Informing them of the type of text, their role, purposes of the listening etc. A short reading passage on a similar topic may help them.

b. While-Listening Stage: activities in this stage must follow the learners’ specific needs, instructional goal, listening purposes and learners’ proficiency level. While listening activities directly relate to the text and listeners are asked to do these during or immediately after listening.

. Some specific cares are required in designing while-listening activities. These are:

a. If the students are asked to give written information after listening, they should have chance to listen the text more than once which makes it easier for them to keep concentration while listening with specific purposes.

b. Writing activities should be to a minimum. As comprehension is the prime target, writing would make the listening more demanding. are samples of this.

c. Global activities like getting the main idea, topic, setting, summary that focus on the content and forms of the text should be given more so that listeners are guided through the text. Listening for the gist is such an activity.

d. More questions should be set up in order to focus student’s attention on the crucial elements that might help to comprehend the text. Following the rout on a map or searching for specific clues to meaning, or identify description of the given pictures might be appropriate here.

e. Attaching predicting activities before listening so that students can monitor their comprehension as they listen. Listening with visuals may serve here.

f. Giving immediate feedback to make the students examine their responses and how it was. Checking off items in a list, distinguishing between formal and informal registers conducted by teacher are examples here.

Listening activities here become varied according to their purposes and objectives. Four major distinctions include Attentive listening, Extensive listening, Intensive listening, Selective listening and Interactive listening.

Attentive listening:

Both of the ideas are true that attentiveness is a prior condition for understanding and listener often lapse attention for various reasons. Losing interest, inability to keep up with, losing track of goals, less confident are some of them. Teacher can help the listeners to hold their attention by personalizing the martial, using the target language while talking to them to keep flow, and lessening their stress and motivating by asking oral responses repeatedly. Activities in this stage would be interesting and easy including face to face interaction, using visual and tangible topics, clear description of the listening procedure, minimum use of written language, and immediate and ongoing responses etc so that learners can easily keep pace with the text and activity.

Listening to short chunks, music image, personal stories, teacher- talk, small question- answer, and interview etc may be applied in this stage.

Extensive listening:

This type of listening has also a greater ease than other types as it is concerned to promote overall comprehension of a text and never requires learners to follow every word and understand them. Learners need to comprehend the text as a whole which is called global understanding. Activities in this section must be chosen in terms with the proficiency level of the listeners.

At the lower level they may have problems to organize the information, so some non-verbal forms in responding might be given such as putting pictures in a right sequence, following directions on a map, checking of items in a photograph, completing a grid, chart or timetable etc.

At the developed stage, some language based tasks requiring constructing meaning, inferring decisions, interpreting text and understanding gist are usually recommended. Completing cloze exercises or giving one or two word answers, multiple choices, predicting the next utterances, forming connected sets of notes, inferring opinions, or interpreting parts of the text are some samples.

Intensive listening:

‘Hearing clearly’ is also a prime aspect of listening as it includes accurate perception without which the second phase of processing meaning becomes very difficult. Listening intensively is quite important to understand the language form of the text as we have to understand both the lexical and grammatical units that lead to form meaning. So, intensive listening requires attention to specific items of language, sound or factual detail such as words, phrase, grammatical units, pragmatic units, sound changes (vowel reduction and consonant assimilation), stress, intonation and pauses etc. Feedback on accuracy and repetition on the teacher’s part promote success here.

Paraphrasing, remembering specific words and sequences, filling gaps with missing words, identifying numbers and letters, picking out particular facts, discriminating the pronunciation of same phoneme in different positions, replacing words, finding stress and boundaries are some good intensive listening practice.

Selective listening:

It involves listening to selected part of a text, as it’s name suggests, to predict information and select ‘cues’ surrounding information. Thus, the listeners may have an assessment of their development in listening to authentic language. Here the focus is on the main parts of the discourse and by noticing these parts listener construct their understanding of the meaning of whole of the text through inferring. As the expectation on understanding is focused and has a purpose, in these activities, listeners have the chance of second listening to check understanding and have feedback repeatedly.

Listening to sound sequences, documentary, story maps, incomplete monologues, conversation cues and topic listening are examples of selective listening.

Interactive listening:

This is a very advanced stag of listening practice as it implies social interaction in small groups which is a ‘true test’ of listening. In interactive listening, learners, either in pairs or in groups, receive new information, identify them continuously. Besides, they have to work out the problems of understanding each other and formulate responses immediately as we are required to do in real life. So, in spite of calling ‘practice’, this goes beyond of it. As this phase involves both comprehension and production, it directly promotes speaking skill. Teachers have a central role in this stage. They have to set up specific goals so that learners can asses their own performance, observe learners’ language in order to provide immediate feedback on their interaction strategies.

Group survey, self introductions, short speeches, chatting and discussing, exchanging news and views, interviewing and being interviewed etc. might be appropriate here.

c. After-listening Stage: post listening activities can be used to check comprehension, valuate listening skill, use of listening strategies and use the knowledge gained to other contexts. So, these are called listening exercises at all and defined as ‘follow-up works.’ The features of these activities are:

a. Related to pre-listening activities, such as predicting.

b. May create a real life situation where students might be asked to use knowledge gained through listening.

c. May extend the topic and help the students remember new vocabulary.

Using notes made while listening in order to write a summary, reading a related text, doing a role play, writing on the same theme, studying new grammatical structures, practicing pronunciation, discussion group, craft project etc. are some post-listening activities.

Variables affecting and effecting successful listening:

Noise: Distractions and noise during the listening segment should be reduced and sound-proof language lab is perfect for this purpose.

Equipment: If the cassette player or CD player being used does not produce acceptable sound quality, it may harm developing skill or motivation.

Repetition: playing the text 2-3 times might be required in respect of the types of texts. In case of no chance of repetition, learners may become anxious about catching it all the first time and that will impede their actual performance.

Content: It is a strong variable to be able to make difference in developing skill. The material should be interesting and appropriate for the class level in topic, speed and vocabulary. Some guidelines for judging the relative ease or difficulty of a listening text for a particular purpose or particular group of students might be:

a. The selected material must be relevant to student’s real life; language of the text should be authentic and would vary in terms of learners’ interest and age group.

b. The storyline, narrative, or instruction should confirm common expectation in organization. It may contain main idea, details, and examples. An informative title might also be helpful.

c. Learners have to be familiar with the topic. They might feel major comprehension difficulties because of misapplication of background knowledge due to cultural differences.

d. At the beginner level of proficiency, the language of listening text should discard redundancy while in the higher proficiency level students may benefit from redundant language.

e. If the text involves more than one individual, the differences between them should be marked conspicuously which can make the comprehension easy.

f. Most texts should have visual supports like clippings, maps, diagrams, pictures or images in video that contextualize the listening input and provide clues to meaning in order to aid their interpretation.

Recording own tape: Any way, recording must be of an English speaker. Copying recording two to three times is preferred in order to avoid rewind which may discrete attention of the listeners.

Using video: Using video clippings with sound off and then asking students what dialogue is taking place is a good practice. Next, the teacher may play sound and check their understanding and interpret them about the discrepancy between their predictions and reality. It may also be done with the video first and giving only sound to guess what the context is can obviously effect comprehending.

Homework: In teaching listening, homework is a must. A listening task between two classes prevent them forgetting. Encouraging public listening and having notes on them is a free pave to walk in teaching listening which leads to success. Providing tape recording with questions, dictation, or a worksheet to complete may bring the expected results.

Using internet: If learners have opportunity to use a computer with internet access and headphones or speakers, teacher may direct them toward some listening practice sites and home works can also be assigned from these accesses

Limitations of the essay:

This essay doesn’t focus on every aspect of teaching or developing listening skill; rather it focuses mainly on the necessity and functions of listening input in learning a foreign or second language. The survey also reflects on the service of listening to the EFL learners who are instrumentally motivated. The context of the assay is this country though it reflects that of some other countries where the features don’t vary much.

Conclusion:

Definitely we have to admit that language learning depends on listening as we respond only after listening something. Listening provides the aural input that serves as the stimuli for language acquisition and make the learners interact in spoken communication. So, effective and ideal language instructors should help the learners to be introduced with native speaking, to be respondent to that both cognitively and orally. In order to do so, first, they should show the students how they can adjust their listening behavior to deal with variety of situations, types of input, and listening purposes.

Questionnaire

Name:

Role:

Department:

Q1: Does practice listening in the language lab help you to develop English skill?

Q2: How does it promote your learning?

Q3: Do watching movies or using video clippings add to your understanding?

Q4: How does interaction with teacher or interference of teacher while listening help you?

Reference:

Byrnes H. (1984). The role of listening comprehension: A theoretical base. Foreign Language Annals, 17: 317-329.

Coakley CG & Wolvin AD. (1986). Listening in the native language. In B. H. Wing (Ed.), Listening, reading, writing: Analysis and application (pp. 11-42). Middlebury, VT: Northeast Conference.

Gass SM.(1988). Integrating research areas: A framework for second language studies. Applied Linguistics. 9:198-217.

Lund RJ. (1990). A taxonomy for teaching second language listening. Foreign Language Annals, 23: 105-115.

Mendelsohn DJ & Rubin J. (1995). A guide for the teaching of second language listening. San Diego, CA: Dominie Press.

Morley J. (1991). Listening comprehension in second/foreign language instruction. In M. Celce-Murcia (Ed.), Teaching English as a second or foreign language (pp. 81-106). Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle.

Nunan D & Miller L. (Eds.). (1995). New ways in teaching listening. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.

Omaggio-Hadley A. (1993). Teaching language in context (2nd Ed.). Boston. MA: Heinle & Heinle.

Peterson PW. (1991). A synthesis of methods for interactive listening. In M. Celce-Murcia (Ed.), Teaching English as a second or foreign language (pp. 106- 122). Boston. MA: Heinle & Heinle.

Richards JC. (1983). Listening comprehension: Approach, design, procedure. TESOL Quarterly. 17: 219-240.

Rixon S.(1981).The design of materials to foster particular linguistic skills. The teaching of listening comprehension. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 258 465).

Rost M. (1990). Listening in language learning. London: Longman.

Rubin J. (1987). Learner strategies: Theoretical assumptions, research history and typology. In A. Wenden & J. Rubin (Eds.), Learner strategies in language learning (pp. 15-30). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Rubin J. (1995). The contribution of video to the development of competence in listening. In D.J. Mendelsohn & J. Rubin (Eds.), A guide for the teaching of second language listening (pp. 151-165). San Diego, CA: Dominie Press.

Underwood M. (1989). Teaching listening. London: Longman.

Syntax - English sentence structure

"If you are not sure whether you have written a good, correct sentence, ask your teacher! And remember: The more you read in English, the better a writer you will become."

Introduction: This page contains some basic information about sentence structure (syntax) and sentence types. It also includes examples of common sentence problems in written English. ESL students who understand the information on this page and follow the advice have a better chance of writing well.
[Note to teachers/advanced students] [Presentation mode]

Definition: Linguists have problems in agreeing how to define the word sentence. For this web page, sentence will be taken to mean: 'a sequence of words whose first word starts with a capital letter and whose last word is followed by an end punctuation mark (period/full stop or question mark or exclamamtion mark)'. On the basis of this definition, some of the sentences written by ESL students (indeed by all writers) will be correct, and other sentences will be problematic. Good readers (teachers, for example!) can quickly see the difference between a correct and a problematic sentence.



Subject/predicate: All sentences are about something or someone. The something or someone that the sentence is about is called the subject of the sentence. In the following sentences the subjects are shown in red. Note how the subject is often, but not always, the first thing in the sentence.

  • John often comes late to class.
    My friend and I both have a dog named Spot.
  • Many parts of the Asian coastline were destroyed by a tsunami in 2004.
  • The old hotel at the end of the street is going to be knocked down to make way for a new supermarket.
  • Sitting in a tree at the bottom of the garden was a huge black bird with long blue tail feathers.
  • The grade 7 Korean boy who has just started at FIS speaks excellent English.
  • On Saturdays I never get up before 9 o'clock.
  • Before giving a test the teacher should make sure that the students are well-prepared.
  • Lying on the sofa watching old films is my favourite hobby.

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The predicate contains information about the someone or something that is the subject. The example sentences above are shown again, this time with the predicate marked in green.

  • John often comes late to class.
    My friend and I both have a dog named Spot.
  • Many parts of the Asian coastline were destroyed by a tsunami in 2004.
  • The old hotel at the end of the street is going to be knocked down to make way for a new supermarket.
  • Sitting in a tree at the bottom of the garden was a huge black bird with long blue tail feathers.
  • The grade 7 Korean boy who has just started at FIS speaks excellent English.
  • On Saturdays I never get up before 9 o'clock.
  • Before giving a test the teacher should make sure that the students are well-prepared.
  • Lying on the sofa watching old films is my favourite hobby.

Do a quiz on the subject and predicate.


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Simple subject/predicate: As you can see from the example sentences above both the subject and the predicate can consist of many words. The simple subject is the main word in the subject, and the simple predicate is the main word in the predicate. The simple subject is always a noun/pronoun and the simple predicate is always a verb.

In the following sentences the simple subject is shown in red and the simple predicate is shown in green.

  • My ESL teacher speaks a little Russian.
  • The young girl with the long black hair fell from her bike yesterday in heavy rain.
  • At the back of the line in the cafeteria yesterday was a large brown dog with a yellow collar around its neck!
  • My friend and I are going on holiday together this year.
  • Your mother or your father must come to the meeting.
  • Sitting in a tree at the bottom of the garden was a huge black bird with long blue tail feathers.

From the last three examples sentences above you will notice that the simple subjects and simple predicates can be more than one word.

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Advice: To write strong, clear sentences you must know who or what you are writing about (subject) and what you want to say about them or it (predicate). Your writing will be more interesting if the subject is not the first thing in every sentence you write.

Do a quiz to identify simple subjects and predicates.


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Sentence types: One way to categorize sentences is by the clauses they contain. (A clause is a part of a sentence containing a subject and a predicate.) Here are the 4 sentence types:

  • Simple: Contains a single, independent clause.
    • I don't like dogs.
    • Our school basketball team lost their last game of the season 75-68.
    • The old hotel opposite the bus station in the center of the town is probably going to be knocked down at the end of next year.
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  • Compound: Contains two independent clauses that are joined by a coordinating conjunction. The most common coordinating conjunctions are: and, or, but, so.)
    • I don't like dogs, and my sister doesn't like cats.
    • You can write on paper, or you can use a computer.
    • A tree fell onto the school roof in a storm, but none of the students was injured.
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  • Complex: Contains an independent clause plus one dependent clause. (A dependent clause starts with a subordinating conjunction. Examples: that, because, although, where, which, since.)
    • I don't like dogs that bark at me when I go past.
    • You can write on paper, although a computer is better.
    • None of the students were injured when the tree fell through the school roof.
    Note: A dependent clause standing alone without an independent clause is called a fragment sentence - see below.
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  • Compound-complex: Contains 3 or more clauses (of which at least two are independent and one is dependent).
    • I don't like dogs, and my sister doesn't like cats because they make her sneeze.
    • You can write on paper, but using a computer is better as you can easily correct your mistakes.
    • A tree fell onto the school roof in a storm, but none of the students was injured although many of them were in classrooms at the top of the building.
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Advice: Writing that contains mostly short, simple sentences can be uninteresting or even irritating to read. Writing that consists of mostly long, complex sentences is usually difficult to read. Good writers, therefore, use a variety of sentence types. They also occasionally start complex (or compound-complex) sentences with the dependent clause and not the independent clause. In the following examples the dependent clause is shown in red:

  • Although it was raining, we decided to go fishing.
  • If it doesn't rain soon, the river will dry out.
  • Because the road was icy and the driver was going too fast, he was unable to brake in time when a fox ran into the road in front of him.

Note: Sentences can also be categorized according to their function. [More]

Note: Independent clauses are also called main clauses. Dependent clauses are also called subordinate clauses.

Do a quiz to identify clause types. Do a quiz to identify sentence types.


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Problematic 'sentences': To write a correct sentence, you need to have a good understanding of what a sentence is. Students who don't have this understanding, or don't take care, often include problem sentences in their writing. Native English speakers are just as likely to write problem sentences as ESL students. There are three main types of problem sentence:

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  • Sentence fragments: Fragment sentences are unfinished sentences, i.e. they don't contain a complete idea. A common fragment sentence in student writing is a dependent clause standing alone without an independent clause. In the each of the following examples the fragment is the second 'sentence', shown in red:
    • I don't think I'm going to get a good grade. Because I didn't study.
    • She got angry and shouted at the teacher. Which wasn't a very good idea.
    • He watched TV for an hour and then went to bed. After falling asleep on the sofa.
    • She got up and ran out of the library. Slamming the door behind her.
    • I have to write a report on Albert Einstein. The famous scientist who left Europe to live in the USA.
    • After riding my bike without problems for over a year, the chain broke. 40 kilometers from my house!

    Advice: If your 'sentence' is a dependent clause, or it doesn't contain both a subject and a predicate, then it is not a proper sentence. You can often detect fragments if you read your writing backwards sentence by sentence, i.e. from the last sentence to the first one. You can usually correct a fragment by connecting it to the sentence before or after it.

    Good writers, who have a full understanding of the sentence, occasionally choose to write a sentence fragment. So you may see sentence fragments in the fiction or even some of the non-fiction you read. As an ESL student, however, you should avoid fragments (except when writing your own creative stories).

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  • Rambling sentences: A rambling sentence is a sentence made up of many clauses, often connected by a coordinating conjunction such as and, or, so.
    • John usually gets up before 7 o'clock, but yesterday his alarm clock did not ring, so he was still asleep when his boss called him at 10.30 to ask where he was and tell him that he would lose his job if he was late again.
    • Although the blue whale has been protected for over 30 years and its numbers are increasing, especially in the North Pacific, where whale hunting has been banned, it is still at risk of extinction as its habitat is being polluted by waste from oil tankers and its main food, the plankton, is being killed off by harmful rays from the sun, which can penetrate the earth's atmosphere because there is a huge hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica.

    Advice: A rambling sentence is quite easy to spot. You have almost certainly written one if your sentence contains more than 3 or 4 conjunctions. If you read the sentence aloud and run out of breath before reaching the end of it, you have written a rambling sentence. If your sentence stretches over many lines of writing, you have certainly written a rambling sentence and most probably a run-on sentence too.

    Unlike run-ons or fragments, rambling sentences are not wrong, but they are tiresome for the reader and one of the signs of a poor writer. You should avoid them.

Do a quiz to identify problematic sentences.


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General advice: If you are not sure whether you have written a good, correct sentence, ask your teacher! And remember: The more you read in English, the better a writer you will become. This is because reading good writing provides you with models of English sentence structure that will have a positive influence on your own written work.

Note: Good writing consists not only of a string of varied, correctly-structured sentences. The sentences must also lead from one to the next so that the text is cohesive and the writer's ideas are coherent. For information on these two important concepts, go to the Language words for non-language teachers page and click on Cohesion.

Popular Park Reopens

The Silas Lake Park reopens today after being closed for six months. The park was closed because mud and rock slides destroyed part of Cambridge Road, the only access into the park. “We had to remove tons of boulders and rocks,” said Hugh Foster of the Parks and Recreation Department. “Then we had to rebuild a bridge and reconstruct almost a mile of highway. I’m really surprised we got it done so soon.”

The park is three miles north of Colfax on Highway 28. Cambridge Road is a two-lane highway that winds upward through Pearl Canyon before it descends to Silas Lake, which has about 20 miles of shoreline. The largest lake in the county, it is also famous for bass. In fact, the record largemouth bass catch in California occurred here in 1975. A 14-year-old boy caught a 19-pound bass.

The lake has two ramps for boaters, a full-service restaurant, a snack bar, a small tackle store, and a boat rental facility. As with all county parks, no alcohol is sold or permitted. More than 100 picnic tables have protective roofs and big barbecue pits. There are public restrooms with free shower facilities, lots of trash cans, and hiking trails for nature lovers. The west side of the park includes a softball field, a soccer field, and two volleyball courts. Horseshoes and kite-flying are two other popular activities. In the summer, a designated swimming area has a lifeguard on duty seven days a week.

The entry fee is $10 per vehicle and $10 per boat. Reservations are not accepted. The parking lot holds about 500 vehicles; if it is full, no additional vehicles are allowed to enter. Latecomers either leave or wait in line for someone to leave the parking lot. Some weekends there are three dozen vehicles waiting in line outside the gate. Because of many requests, park officials soon might start permitting campers to stay overnight on weekends.

The park is open from dawn to 10 p.m. during the summer. “We probably average 2,000 people here every day during the summer,” said Foster. “They come here to fish, swim, water-ski, jet-ski, picnic, commune with Mother Nature, you name it. People love this place.”

Gets Booked, Writes a Book

A man convicted of writing bad checks to casinos has written a book that he predicts will become a national bestseller. Entitled A Casino Is Born Every Minute, the 250-page book details James Duncan’s successful and unsuccessful attempts to beat casinos. Duncan is serving a five-year sentence for grand larceny in the Las Vegas city jail. He wrote 18 bogus checks, ranging in value from $3,000 to $10,000, at 17 different casinos. “My only mistake was cashing that last check at the same casino I had cashed the first check at,” said Duncan. “They were waiting for me.”

Duncan only has a few months left before he is released from the jail. During his incarceration, he used the library facilities and computers to write his book. He completed the book two months ago and is now shopping it around to various publishers.

Books about gambling and casinos are very popular. People like to read about gangsters, beautiful women, flashy cars, posh hotels, and the exciting possibilities of winning it all and losing it all. Duncan says he was the first card-counter in Las Vegas. He claims that he made almost $1 million at blackjack. Then, other card sharks started copying his technique.

“They abused the system,” said Duncan. “They got greedy. If they’d been like me, and just won some here and there, different places, and different nights, the casinos wouldn’t have gotten suspicious so fast.” When the casinos realized what was going on, they started using two or more decks at the blackjack tables to thwart the counters. They escorted out anyone they suspected of counting cards.

Get the Audio by click this icon;

Woman Dies in House Fire

An 80-year-old woman died Tuesday afternoon in a fire. The blaze was reported about 2:30 p.m. at a home on Sunnyside Avenue. The victim was identified as Mary Cass. Her husband, Roy Cass, 80, was not at home at the time of the fire. Investigators from the local fire department were trying to determine the exact cause of the fire. They said it looked like the woman had fallen asleep on the sofa with a cigarette in her hand.

The value of the home was estimated at $700,000. The Casses were married in 1945. Both of them had been smokers throughout most of their lives.

Mr. Cass said, “Six months ago, we decided to quit smoking, because we wanted to live to be 100. So we went to a smoking cessation clinic. The clinic worked! We both managed to quit a month ago. At least I thought we both did. I can't believe she was smoking behind my back.”

Mr. Cass started sobbing after his remarks. He repeatedly cried out his wife’s name. Authorities took him to a nursing home where he could be kept under surveillance.

“We’ve had too many instances of long-time married couples who, if they discover their spouse is dead, commit suicide within 48 hours,” said a nursing home spokesperson. “Mr. Cass’s behavior has been erratic, from talking nonstop to crying to staring vacantly. We are going to have to watch him closely.”

This is the Audio:

Grammar; Irregular Verbs - 1

Click on the answer button to see the correct answer.

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gowentgone
become
began
blown
break
brought
built
buy
caught
chosen
come
cut
done
draw
drank
driven
eat
fell
felt
fight
found

Animal Idioms

Read the sentences and try to guess the meaning of the idioms.
Click the answer button to see the correct answer.

  1. Wow! It's raining cats and dogs today! I wish I'd brought my umbrella to school!
    a. I forgot my umbrella today.
    b. It's raining heavily.
    c. Cats and dogs are falling from the sky.
  2. When I told my mom I would be home around 2 am, she had a cow!
    a. My mom bought a baby cow.
    b. My mom is really strange.
    c. My mom was really upset.
  3. Jean: How did you know it was my birthday today?
    Susan: Oh, a little birdie told me!
    a. Jean told Susan it was her birthday.
    b. An unnamed person told Susan about Jean's birthday.
    c. Susan told Jean it was her birthday.
  4. Frank: Why didn't your brother ride the roller coaster with us?
    Sam: Oh, he's such a scaredy cat! He won't get on any fast ride.
    a. Sam's brother is afraid to ride the roller coaster.
    b. Sam's brother is a cat.
    c. Sam's brother didn't go to the roller coaster.
  5. When the telephone salesman told me I could buy some concert tickets for only $10.00 if I gave him my credit card number, it seemed a little fishy to me, so I hung up the phone.
    a. I thought the telephone salesman smelled like a fish and I didn't like that.
    b. I thought the phone salesman was a dangerous fish and he scared me.
    c. I thought the phone salesman was dishonest and I felt suspicious of him.
  6. I never learned how to use a computer, so I lost my job to a new employee. It's a dog-eat-dog world.
    a. Only the strong or the best survive.
    b. Dogs are eating dogs at the office.
    c. Dogs like to eat dogs for lunch.

Research essay

The research essay is one of the most popular writing assignments in the colleges and universities of this nation. There are several indispensable elements that should be taken into account before you start writing the research essay.

1. You should choose an interesting topic. It will facilitate the process of the writing of your research essay as well as make the process more productive and fascinating.
2. Do research on the topic.
3. Design and write the research essay.

Yet, these three easy steps are so easy for many students. Many tutors are not satisfied with the papers completed by their students. One often can hear the complaints that the papers are imbedded with platitudes and generalities. Let us see how the research paper must look like.

Look at our plan.

The first step is to choose your topic. Some topics are assigned to you, but sometimes you have to choose. For instance, you might be studying �European history at the beginning of the 20th century�. You may be asked to describe some events or some persons who, in your opinion, influenced the life and history of European continent at the beginning of the 20th century. First, choose an interesting and important event or personality. Try to narrow your topic, you should not choose too general subject. Remember that a broad topic can be superficial, you can say much about it, yet you will not be able to provide deep analysis of the topic you research.

For example, avoid topics like: �European countries at the beginning of the 20th century�. The following one is much better: �The introduction of parliamentary system in 1907 in Sweden and its consequences for the political situation in this country in 1910�. With this topic you have more possibilities for the analysis as well as for the research.

Do not succumb to another common mistake made by many students. When you are asked to research the topic, you should not retell the story - you should provide some analysis as well as show that you understand the topic you have researched. Before you start working on your essay you should conduct some research - read several articles on the topic you wish to research and try to find out several controversial issues, based on what you have read in your sources. Do not try to ask too many questions - confine yourself to one clear sentence. It is an important point, because many students attempt to answer several questions in their essays, whereas answering the one is suffice. It is a prerequisite, a vital element of this assignment. Once you have chosen your topic, you should start designing the plan of your essay. All research papers should comprise several indispensable elements; the structure of the essay should be the following:

Introduction. The aim of the introduction is twofold. First, it should acquaint your reader with the preliminary description of the topic. Second, you should state your research question. The introduction always comprises your research question.

The Body.The body is the central part of your essay. As usual it consists of several parts, each represents some sub-headings of your topic. Sometimes, students experience difficulties with designing the body of their essays. Certainly, it is not an easy task; nevertheless it can be accomplished successfully once you have decided on the order of presenting your material. Sometimes, it is necessary to include the section that describes the assertions as well contentions of your opponents. Also include a separate section providing your point of view.

The conclusion. Sum up the main points of your research and provide the reader with the logic conclusion.

Essay Writing Tips

"Be yourself. Above all, let who you are, what you are, what you believe, shine through every sentence you write, every piece you finish."

John Jakes


Reading works of prominent writers we think that writing comes to them as if by magic touch. The right words just jump down onto paper from their heads, elegant sentences are formed instantly by themselves. All the writer has to do is just to write it all down. We regard writing as some innate gift given to the few. That is why most of us are too critical and unfair to ourselves when we judge our own writing. In fact, writing like any skill can be acquired if you are ready to work hard, be persistent and patient. BestEssayTips.com is here to show you how to write better.

Basically we have designed our site for college students, but this information will be helpful for all people seeking advice on writing. Here you can find many useful tips on writing that will help you avoid most common pitfalls and refine your writing style. Our site provides you with a comprehensive guide to writing different types of essays and makes difficult things easy for you.

Our essay guide explains all the intricacies and details of essay writing process from drawing up plans to editing your final draft. Whether you don�t know how to start writing the essay or you want to find out how you should complete it BestEssayTips.com has advice on every issue concerning essay writing process.

Our guide will become your reliable companion and consultant in composing various kinds of essays. You will learn how to present your thoughts and ideas on the paper, how to sound authoritative and convincing, in brief how to become a better writer. We have pursued one more goal building up this site � we want you to like writing and view it as a pleasant and thought-stimulating activity.



Writing is like a journey: you start with a blank sheet of paper and what appears on it in the end of the trip depends only on you. You should go through every stage of essay writing process described in this guide to write the essay that:

  • is focused;
  • is logical;
  • is clear;
  • is well-structured;
  • is deeply-argumentative;
  • grabs the reader's interest from the first lines;
  • does not pad;
  • provides illustrative evidence;
  • gives credits to sources.

This journey may take a long time and be challenging at times, but do not step back. Our guide will be a constant beacon lightening your path as you proceed.

Judul Skripsi sebagai referensi

1. SOME PROBLEMS OF READING COMPREHENSION AT MTSN PURWOREJO AND HOW TO SOLVE THEN – 92
2. A STUDY ON TEACHING ENGLISH AND IT’S METDHOD AT MTSN MLINJON KLATEN – 92
3. THE STUDENT ABILITY AND THEIR OBSTRUETIONS IN CONSTRUCTING ENGLISH SENTENCES BASEN UPON THE CURICCULUM OF 1984 AT MAN CILACAP – 90
4. A STUDI ON COMMON ERRORS IN THE APPLICATION OF VERBS IN THE BASIC SENTENCES OF ENGLISH FOR THE SECOND GRADE STUDENTS AT MAN BOYOLALI – 92
5. SOME CAUSES OF FAICURF IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AT MADRASAH ALIYAH “SUNAN KALIJAGA” BATANG – 94
6. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH READING TO SECOND YEAR STUDENTS OF MAN TEMANGGUNG
7. THE TEACHING OG GERUND AND PRESENT PARTICIPLEAT MADRASAH ALIYAH MUA’ALUDDIN MAGETAN – 91
8. THE TEACHING OF PHRASES AT SMA ISLAM SUDIRMAN TEMBARAK TEMANGGUNG – 91
9. GROWING AND DEVELOPING CONVERSATION AT THE SECOND GRADE OF MAN BOYOLALI – 92
10. PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DI SMP MUHAMMADIYAH KLATEN (TINJAUAN METODOLOGI) – 91
11. IMPACS OF CAPITALLYM ON AMERICAN SOCIETS REFELCTION IN THE GREAT GATSBY FOR THE UPPER CLASS AND THE GRADE SOF WRATH FOR THE LOWER CLASS – 90
12. READING AND BUILDING SENTENCES AS A METHOD OF TEACHING ENGLISH MAN LABORATORIUM FAKULTY TARBIYAH IAIN SUNAN KALIJAGA YOGYAKARTA – 90
13. A STUDY ON THE ACHIEMENT INDEX AND ENGLISH COMPETENCE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION STUDENTS – 94
14. TECHING READING TO THE FIRST SEMESTER STUDENTS OF SEKOLAH MENENGAH SENI RUPA (SMSR) YOGYAKARTA – 86
15. AN ANALISYS OF ENGLISH BERSAL PHRAXES HAVING THE PREPOSITION UP – 86
16. HELENA A WING’S SELF CONCLOUSNESS AND HER EXPECTATIONS OF THE EQUILIBRIUM OF NAPPS LIFE – 89
17. DREAMS, STRUGGLES AND SACRIFICES IN JENNIE GER HAROT – 89
18. MANAGEMENT OF THE LIBRARY BETWEEN MTSN KARANGANOM LIBRARY AND SMP MUHAMMADIYAH IX KLATEN’S LIBRARY COMPARATIVE STUDY – 86
19. KOSONG
20. HOW THE USE POERY IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AT THE SMA – 86
21. ADJECTIVE CLAUSE PENGGUNAANNYA DALAM KALIMAT – 89
22. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE READING MATERIALS OF THE SECOND SEMESTER OF SMA AND THE CURICULUM 1984 OF ENGLISH – 86
23. BEBERAPA PROBLEM PELAKSANAAN PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DI SMP AL-ISLAM PEHNANGKA, PARON NGAWI – 83
24. PENGAJARAN DIALOG PADA BIDANG STUDI BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II MTS NEGERI YOGYAKARTA II – 94
25. METODE PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DI KELAS II MTS NEGERI JANTEN KULON PROGO – 95
26. ACHIEVEMENT OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR OF SECOND YEAR STUDENTS IN MAN I KEBUMEN – 94
27. THE PROBLEMS OF TRANSLATING INDONESIA HOUN PHRASE INFO ENGLISH AT SMA INSTITUT INDONESIA I YOGYAKARTA – 95
28. PENGGUNAAN TEKNIK SOSIOMETRI DALAM PEMBENTUKAN KELOMPOK BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS II DI SMP MUHAMMADIYAH KENTUNGAN YOGYAKARTA – 94
29. THE PROBLEMS OF TEACHING ENGLISH CONVERSATION AT SMP MUHAMMADIYAH SUMBERLAWANG SRAGEN – 92
30. A SEMANTIC STUDY OF SOME ENGLISH PREPOSITIONS ( A VIEW OF CASE CATEGORY) – 95
31. PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DI KELAS II SMP NEGERI 3 DEPOK SLEMAN YOGYAKARTA – 93
32. HAMBATAN-HAMBATAN DALAM PROSES BELAJAR MENGAJAR BIDANG STUDI BAHASA INGGRIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI BABADAN BARU FILIAL NGEMPLAK SLEMAN YOGYA – 95
33. STUDY ON READING COMPREHENSION AND BUILDING SENTENCES AT SECOND YEAR OF MADRASAH ALIYAH NEGERI PURWOREJO – 93
34. THE SUGGESTED SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES FOR THE LESSON UNIT 6 UNTIL END OF SEMESTER IV OF THE SMA BASED ON THE SMA CURRICULUM 19765 – 85
35. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF SMA STUDENTS PROBLEMS IN UNDERSTANDING AND USING COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS – 84
36. METODE PEMBERIAN TUGAS BELAJAR DAN RESITASI PELAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DI MAN WONOKROMO KAB. BANTUL
37. TEACHING THE MEANING OF ACTIVITY BERBS FOR SMA BY USING TPR – 91
37. HORROR IN THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE – 90 (S2)
38. VERSED IN COUNTRY THINGS : ROBERT FROST AS A NATURE POET – 89
39. DEMOCRACY AND TECHNOLOGY “THE OLD WORD VIEW” UNRESOLVED CONFLICTS IN MARK TWAIN’S A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARHUR’S COURT – 90 (S2)
40. THE IRONY OF AMERICAN SUCCES AS REFLECTED IN JACK LONDO’S MARTIN EDEN – 89 (S2)
41. UNDERSTANDING THE USE OF ADJECTIVES IN
42. THE IMPLICATION OF THE CIVIL WAR IN ARMADA AND THE FUTURE OF THE COUNTRY A CASE STUDY OF THE SOCIO-POLITICAL STRUCTURE – 00 (S2)
43. RELIGIOUS DECADENCES AS SEEN IN FLANNERY O’CONNOR’S WISW BLOOD – 89
44. A STUDY ON THE ENGLISH PATTERN BASED UPON THE VERB AND IT’S APPLICATION IN RELATION TO THE MAN ENGLISH CURICCULUM OF 1984
45. A STUDY ON THE APPLICATION OF THE 1984 ENGLISH CURICULUM THE SECOND YEAR STUDENTS OF PHISICS AND BIOLOGY PROGRAM AT MADRASAH ALIYAH NEGERI PEKALONGAN – 89
46. COMPETITION
47. ENGLISH NEGATION AS DIALECT FEATURE IN TOM’S SAWYER’S SPEECH MARK TWAIN’S THE ADVENTURE OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN – 99
48. I AM OF IRELAND
BY W.B YEATS
A BRIEF EXPLICATION, POETRY A MEANS OF TEACHING PRONOUNCIATION – 86
49. DICUSSION OF TIME – 84
50. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE STUDENT’S ACHIEVEMENT ON READING BETWEEN USING MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST AND ESSAY TEST AT SMA PGRI I PAKISHAJI MALANG
51. DISCRIPTIVE STUDY ON THE MOTIVATION AND ATTITUDE OF THE CITRA TAXI DRIVER IN MALANG TOWARD ENGLISH – 96
52. THE SOCIAL RESPONBILITY OF PASTORAL CARE MINISTRY AT THE HOSPITAL SETTING IN INDONESIA
53. HOLDEN CAUFIELD : A POTRAIT OF ADOLESECENCE AND ADDOLSCENT NON COMFORMITY AN ANALISYS OF THE MAIN CHARACTER OF J.D SALINGER/S THE CATHER IN THE RYE
54. AN ANALISYS ON THE HUMOROUS OF BERNARD SHAWS PLAY 25 ENTITTLED “PYGMACION” – 92
55. TEACHING ENGLISH PRONOUNCIATION TO JAVANESE STUDENTS – 91
56. A CONTRASTIVE ANALISYS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND DAYAKNESE SIMPLE SENTENCE – 92
57. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF FLASH CARDS AS TEACHING MEDIA ON STUDENTS MASTENING OF STRUCTURE AT MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI PANEKAN KEC. PANEKAN KAB. MAGETAN – 91
58. RELIGIONS ASPECTS IN THE BRIDGE OF SAN HIS RHYAN ANALISYS OF THE EPISODES AND THE DESCRIPLTIONS – 91
59. ANALISYS OF THE IRONY IN THE CARACTERISATION OF THE CENTRAL CHARACTER IN GREAT EXPECTATION BY CHARLES DIDEENS – 00
60. STUDI TENTANG AKTIVITAS BELAJAR MENGAR BAHASA INGGRIS DI SMP AL-WASHILAH KAB. CIREBON – 92
61. STUDENTS ABILITY IN TRANSLATING ENGLISH SENTENCES AT MAN GONDANGREJO KARANGANYAR – 93
62. DEVELOPING STUDENT’S ABILITY IN USING ENGLISH AS A MEANS OF COMMUNICATION AT SMA MUHAMMADIYAH BROSOT KULON PROGO – 93
63. THE MAIN PROBLEMS OF DEVELOPING WRITING SHILL – 92
64. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE FOR THE GIRST GRADE STUDENTS’S AT SMA NEGERI KALIBAWANG KULON PROGO – 95
65. DEVELOPING STUDENT’S ABILITY USING ENGLISH AS MEANS OF COMMUNICATION AT SMA MUHAMMADIYAH BROSOT KULON PROGO – 93
66. STUDI KORELASI ANTARA PENGUASAAN KOSAKATA DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS III MTS NURUL ULUM MRANGGEN DEMAK – 97
67. PENGUASAAN KALIMAT BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II MTS NEGERI PUNDONG BANTUL – 95
68. PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH RAUDHATUL ULUM GUYANGAN WEDANJAKSAJATI – 93
69. PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN METODE GRAMMAR TRANSLATION SISWA KELAS I SMA MUHAMMADIYAH I YOGYAKARTA – 93
70. STUDI TENGANG PENGAJARAN CONVERSATION DI SMP MODERN ISLAMIC SCHOOL (MIS) SURAKARTA – 93
71. STUDI KORELASI ANTARA PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS III MTS NURUL ULUM MRANGGEN DEMAK – 97
72. PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN METODE GRAMMAR TRANSLATION SISWA KELAS I SMA MUHAMMADIYAH I YOGYAKARTA – 93
73. STUDI TENTANG PENGAJARAN SPEAKING PADA TINGKAT ALIYAH DI PONDOK PESANTREN MODERN ISLAM ASSALAM SURAKARTA – 93
74. PERBDAAN ANTARA EJAAN BAHASA INGGRIS BRITISH DAN BAHASA INGGRIS AMERIKA (SUATU TINJAUAN KONSTRUKTIF BAGI GURU BAHASA INGGRIS) – 93
75. WACANA SEBAGAI ALAT UNTUK MENGEMBANGKAN KOSA KATA BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II SMP MUHAMMADIYAH IV YOGYAKARTA – 95
76. THE TEACHING ENGLISH FOR THE LATE CHILD HOOD OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YEARS (AN EARLY EXPLORATION OF THE NON LINGUISTIC ASPECTS) – 94
77. MATERI DAN METODE PENGAJARAN PELAFALAN DI KELAS I MTS NEGERI YOGYAKARTA II –
78. PENGEMBANGAN KEMAMPUAN SISWA BERDIALOG DALAM INGGRIS DI SMP AL MA’ARID PAJEKSAN KOTAMADYA YOGYAKARTA – 94
79. STUDI TENTANG MATERI DAN METODE PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DI KELAS I SMP IHSANIYAH TEGAL – 94
80. STUDENTS ABILITY IN TRANSLATING ENGLISH SENTENCES AT MAN CONDANGREJO KARANGANYAR – 93
81. THE MAYOR PROBLEM IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AT SMA PUTRA BAKTI PLERET BANTUL YOBYAKARTA – 93
82. ELIOT’S AFFIRMATION OF FREEDOM OF CHOICE IN THIS THE CONVIDENTAL CLARK – 96
83. THE IMPORTANT OF ADAPTIBILITY AS PORTAYED I JACK LONDON’S WHITE FANG – 95
84. GEORGE WILLARD’S PROCESS OF MATURITY IN SHEEWOOD ANDERSONS’S WINISBURG OHIO – 92
85. THE CHANGING OF AMERICAN FAMILY STRUCTURE IN THE LAST THREE DECADES – 98
86. TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE THROUGH THE SILENT WAS METHOD – 988
87. THE APPLICATION OF COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH IN THE CURICCULUM OF SPG – 88
88. A BRIEF EXPLICATION POETRY, A MEANS OF TEACHING STRESS AND….. (THE BALLAD OF FATHER GILUGAN) BY W.B. YEAR – 86
89. COMMUNICATION ACTIVITIES APPLIED AT SMA DE BRITTO IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR OF 1986-1987 – 88
90. A …. STUDY ON VERBS CONSISTING OF VERBS PLUS FORM AND VERB PLUS THROUGH – 86
91. TEACHING CONDITIONAL SENTENCES THROUGH GAMES TO THE SMA STUDENTS – 91
92. THE IGNATION PEDA (AN ALTENATIVE LEARNING TEACHING….) – 94
93. THE SOLITARY READER
BY WILLIAM WORDS WOETH
AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH
TEACHING PRONUNCIATION THROUGH…. – 87
94. USING GROUP DISCUSSION FOR : TEACHING SPEAKING TO SMA STUDENTS : A WAY TO IMPROVE SMA STUDENTS ENGLISH SPEAKING ABILITY – 90
95. USING GROUP DISCUSSION FOR : TEACHING SPEAKING TO SMA STUDENTS : A WAY TO IMPROVE SMA STUDENTS ENGLISH SPEAKING ABILITY – 90
96. THE INFLUENCE OF INTERACTION TO THE STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT IN GRAMMAR – 84
97. KOSONG
98. UNDERSTANDING WILLIAM WORD SWORTH’S POETRY AND THE INDENTIFICATION OF ITS PARTS OF SPEECH – 87
99. 1984 : A BIOGRAPICHAL ANALISYS – 89
100. COMMUNICATION ACTIVITY MATERIALS FOR SMA FIRST SEMESTER STUDENTS – 88
101. LEARNING TEACHING INTERACTION IN HIGH SCHOOLS – 84
102. THE SITUATIONAL LANGUAGE TEACHING AND ITS POSSIBLE APPLICATION IN THE TEACHING OF STRUCTURE IN SMA – 90
103. I AM O IRELAND
BY W.B
A BRIF EXPLICATION, POETRY A MEANS OF TEACHING PRONOUNCLATION – 86
104. USEFUL QUESTIONS FOR COMPREHENDING PASSAGES – 88
105. ROLE PLAYING THE MOST APPRORIATE SPEAKING TESTING FORMAT FOR SMTA STUDENTS – 86
106. KOSONG
107. A SHORT ANALISYS
TEACHING PRONOUNCIATION THROUGH….
108. LEARNING TEACHING INTRACTION IN SPEAKING CLASS – 89
109. USING PICTURES AS AN ALTERNATIVE MEDIUM IN TEACHING “ENGLISH COMPARATIVE DEGREE” – 03
110. KORELASI ANTARA KEMAMPUAN PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY DENGAN KEMAMPUAN PEMAHAMAN ISI BACAAAN SISWA KELAS II SLTP JALAN JAWA DI SURABAYA – 03
111. PENGARUH BUKU CERITA BERBAHASA INGGRIS DALAM PELAJARAN MEMBACA (RADING COMPREHENSION) TERHADAPO PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS II SMP JALANG JAWA SURABAYA – 03
112. UPAYA MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN VOCABULARY DALAM MATA PELAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MEDIA PERMAINAN MONOPOLI DI SD BINA PUTRA SURABAYA – 03
113. HUBUNGAN ANTARA FASILITAS BELAJAR DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA DALAM BIDANG STUDI BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II SMK ARIF RACHMAN HAKIM SURABAYA – 01
114. ANALISIS KESALAHAN DALAM PENGGUNAAN POLA POST CONTINOUS TENSE – 03
115. STUDI TENTANG PENGARUH GAMES TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR VOCABULARY SISWA KELAS IV SD AL-ISTIQOMAH SURABAYA – 01
116. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA KELAS III SLTP TEUKU UMAR SURABAYA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN QUESTION TAGS – 00
117. PENGAJARAN TENSES DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN GRAMMAR TRANSLATION METHOD PADA SISWA MTS AL-MA’ARIF PLANDIREJO PLUMPANG TUBAN – 02
118. PERBEDAAN PRESTASI BELAJAR ”READING COMPREHENSION” YANG PENGAJARANNYA MENGGUNAKAN COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH (CA) DAN YANG MENGGUNAKAN GRAMMAR TRANSLATION METHOD (GTM) – 01
119. STUDI TENTANG KATA-KATA SERAPAN BAHASA INGGRIS DALAM BAHASA INDONESIA YANG TERDAPAT PADA ARTIKEL EKONOMI JAWA POS – 02
120. FAKTOR-FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI MOTIVASI DALAM MEMPELAJARI BAHASA INGGRIS SEBAGAI BAHASA ILMU PENGETAHUAN SISWA KELAS VI SD NEGERI LIDAH KULON V SURABAYA – 02
121. ANALISIS KESALAHAN DALAM PENGGUNAAN KALIMAT PRESENT COUNTINOUS TENSE – 01
122. ANALISIS KESALAHAN STRUKTUR KALIMAT PASIF BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS II CATUR WULAN II SMU KATHOLIK ST. HENDRIKUS SURABAYA – 03
123. PENGGUNAAN MAJALAH BAHASA INGGRIS SEBAGAI BAHAN OTENTIK DALAM PENGAJARAN READING PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP MARYAM SURABAYA
124. HUBUNGAN ANTARA KEMAMPUAN VOCABULARY TERHADAP KETERAMPILAN MENULIS 9WRITING) DALAM LAMARAN PEKERJAAN PADA SISWA KELAS II CATURWULAN II SMK DR. SOETOMO SURABAYA – 02
125. HUBUNGAN PEMANFATAAN FASILITAS BUKU-BUKU BACAAN TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN MEMBACA SISWA KELAS II SLTP YPM 2 SUKODONO SIDOARJO JATIM – 03
126. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP PENGAJARAN STRUCTURE SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE SISWA KELAS II SLTP SURYO NUGROHO SURABAYA – 03
127. PERBANDINGAN PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR DALAM PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR KELAS II SLTP KEPANJEN I SURABAYA – 03
128. PENGGUNAAN LABORATORIUM BAHASA UNTUK MENUNJANG CARA BERBICARA SISWA SMU BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 02
129. ANALISA KESULITAN SISWA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN GERUND DAN PRESENT PARTICIPLE DALAM KALIMAT PADA SISWA KELAS II-G SMU NEGERI 16 SURABAYA – 00
130. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN PREPOSITION OF TIME OLEH SISWA KELAS I SLTP BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 02
131. VERB ING DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS SEBAGAI PROGRESSIVE DAN GERUND – 02
132. PENGGUNAAN CODE MIXING (PERCAMPURAN BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN BAHASA SLANK INDONESIA) DI LINGKUNGAN SALON JOHNY ANDREAN DI THR MALL SURABAYA – 03
133. PENGARUH MEDIA LAGU BARAT TERHADAP PENINGKATAN KEMAMPUAN VOCABULARY SISWA KELAS V SD NEGERI PERAK UTARA IV NO. 61 SURABAYA – 03
134. VISUAL AIDS SEBAGAI TEKNIK PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY SLTP NEGERI 35 SURABAYA – 02
135. STUDI TENTANG PENDAPAT SISWA MENGENAI PENGAJARAN WRITING DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN GAMBAR SERI PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 02
136. PENGARUH PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN MEMAHAMI BACAAN BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II SMK PAWIYATAN SURABAYA – 01
137. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PENGUASAAN STUCTURE DENGAN PEMAHAMAN READING DI SLTP NEGERI 35 SURABAYA – 00
138. PENGAJARAN WRITING PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP KARTIKA U-I SURABAYA – 01
139. STUDI KORELASI EQ SISWA DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA BAHASA INGGRIS PADA SISWA KELAS II BUSANA SMK NEGERI 2 PONOROGO – 03
140. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN READING PASSAGE TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 02
141. PERBEDAAN NILAI PRESTASI READING ANTARA LULUSAN SMU JURUSAN BAHASA DAN JURUSAN NON BAHASA PADA MAHASISWA PROGRAM STUDI BAHASA INGGRIS ANGKATAN 2002-2003 UNIPA SURABAYA – 03
142. PENGARUH KEBIASAAN MEMBACA TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II-G DAN II-7 SMU SEJAHTERA I SURABAYA – 01
143. HUBUNGAN ANTARA KEMAMPUAN READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN KEMAMPUAN WRITING SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 39 SURABAYA – 01
144. PENGGUNAAN ROLE PLAS DALAM PENGAJARAN SPEAKING PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 2 JATIREJO – 01
145. KESALAHAN-KESALAHAN DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SAMPLE PRESENT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 23 SURABAYA – 03
146. USING LANGUAGE LABORATORY TO ENHANCE THE STUDENTS SPEAKING SKILL AT SLTP NEGERI 22 SURABAYA – 03
147. THE INFLUENCE OF LABORATORY TRAINING TECHNIQUE IN TEACHING ENGLISH STUDENTS SPEAKING ABILITY IMPROVEMENT OF THE FISRT YEAR OF SMK ARIEF RAHMAN HAKIM SURABAYA – 00
148. PENGARUH NILAI EBTANAS MURNI TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 2 BUDURAN SIDOARJO – 01
149. AN ALTERNATIVE TEACHING SPEAKING THROUGH GAMES TO THE YEAR STUDENTS OF SMP NEGERI 30 SURABAYA – 01
150. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PENGUASAAN STRUCTURE DENGAN PRESTASI WRITING SISWA KELAS II SLTP DHARMA WANITA 17 SONOAYU SIDOARJO – 01
151. STUDI KORELASI ANTARA MOTIVASI BELAJAR BERHUBUNGAN DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS DI SMK PAWIYATAN SURABAYA KELAS II – 02
152. PERANAN METODE GTM DALAM PENGAJARAN TENSES (PRESENT CONTIOUNOUS TENSE, PRESENT TENSE, PAST TENSE, FUTURE TENSE) DI SMK NEGERI 4 MADIUN – 02
153. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN LAGU-LAGU BAHASA INGGRIS DALAM PENGAJARAN SPEAKING TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS II SMK NEGERI 3 KEDIRI – 03
154. HUBUNGAN PENGUASAAN SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENULIS SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 12 SURABAYA – 03
155. PENGARUH STATUS SOSIAL EKONOMI KELUARGA TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA DI SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 03
156. KORELASI ANTARA PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY DENGAN PEMAHAMAN BACAAN TERHADAP SISWA KELAS I SMU SEJAHTERA I SURABAYA – 03
157. ANALISIS MATERI BACAAN PADA BUKU PAKET THE GLOBAL LANGUAGE FOR SLTP STUDENT 2 BERDASARKAN PENYESUAIAN KURIKULUM 1994 (SUPLEMEN GBPP 1999) – 03
158. KESALAHAN-KESALAHAN DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 23 SURABAYA – 03
159. TEKNIK-TEKNIK PENGAJARAN MEMBACA BAHASA INGGRIS UNTUK SISWA SD – 02
160. HUBUNGAN ANTARA METODE EGRA TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR STRUCTURE SISWA KELAS I E SLTP PGRI SURABAYA – 01
161. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PRESENT PERFECT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 1 MADURAN LAMONGAN – 03
162. ANALISIS PRONOUNCIATION DAN VOCABULARY KARYAWAN DALAM PENULISAN BUSINESS LETTER DI CV. REGULATOR MAS – 00
163. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR (FLASH CARD) DALAM PENGAJARAN SPEAKING TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS I SMK PAWIYATAN SURABAYA – 01
164. PENGARUH PEMAHAMAN BACAAN TERHADAP KETERAMPILAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 01
165. ANALISIS KESULITAN-KESULITAN YANG DIHADAPI SISWA DALAM MEMPELAJARI ENGLISH PRONOUNCIATION – 01
166. ANALISIS KONFLIK PAUL MOREL SEBAGAI TOKOH UTAMA DALAM SASTRA NOVEL SONS AND LOVERS KARYA D.H. LAWRENCE – 01
167. ANALISIS PENYEBAB KESULITAN SISWA DALAM BELAJAR READING COMPREHENSION KELAS II SLTP KARTIKA II – I SURABAYA – 02
168. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN SIMPLE PAST TENSE YANG BERPENGARUH PADA TATA TULIS BAHASA SISWA KELAS I SMU SEJAHTERA I SURABAYA – 02
169. THE INFLUENCE OF USING STILL PICTURES ON STUDENTS SPEAKING ABILITY AT THE FIRST CLASS OF SMU BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 02
170. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SIMPLE PAST TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 3 SURABAYA – 02
171. THE INFLUENCE OF USING FLASCARDS IN TEACHIG VOCABULARY TO TK ISLAM MARYAM STUDENTS – 03
172. KOSONG
173. PENGARUH PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN MENULIS NARASI DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II SLTP YPM 2 SUKODONO SIDOARJO – 03
174. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PRESENT CONTINOUS TENSE DALAM KALIMAT PASIF SISWA KELAS II DI SLTP NEGERI 27 SURABAYA – 03
175. TEACHING ORAL ENGLISH THROUGH DISCUSIONS TO SMU STUDENT – 00
176. PENGARUH TEKNIK EGRA DALAM PENGAJARAN STRUCTURE TERAHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS I SMU NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 00
177. THE MOTIVATION OF ENGLISH DEPARTMENT STUDENT TO STUDY IN LANGUAGE LABORATORS OF PGRI ADI BUANA UNIVERSITY – 00
178. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN SIMPLE PAST TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP KEPANJEN I SURABAYA – 01
179. APLIKASI ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSE (ESP) PADA PEGAWAI MARGEO THE BOOK STORE AND NET CAFÉ SURABAYA – 01
180. PENGAJARAN SPEAKING DI KELAS II USAHA JASA PARIWISATA SMK 10 SURABAYA – 01
181. PENGARUH PELAKSANAAN PENGAJARAN DALAM MENINGKATKAN KEBERHASILAN BELAJAR SISWA DI SMP NEGERI 30 SURABAYA – 01
182. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN STRUCTURE SIMPLE PAST TENSE MELALUI CERPEN (SHORT STORIES) TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS VI DI SPI BAHRUL ULUM SURABAYA – 01
183. PENGGUNAAN METODE DAN MEDIA TERHADAP PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS PADA SISWA SD KELAS IV DAN V SD NEGERI KETABANG III SURABAYA – 01
184. ANALISIS KESULITAN-KESULITAN SISWA KELAS I SMU NEGERI I CERME DALAM MEMPELAJARI KATA SIFAT KUANTITATIF BAHASA INGGRIS – 01
185. ANALISIS TENTANG KARAKTER PERAN UTAMA PRIA (PAK KELADA) DALAM CERITA MR. KNOOR ALI W SOMERSET MAUGHAM – 01 (SASTRA)
186. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN TOPIC DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE EGRA TERAHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS II DI SMK NEGERI 6 SURABAYA – 01
187. PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MEDIA GAMBAR PADA SISWA KELAS II C SLTP PGRI I SURABAYA – 02
188. PENGARUH METODE DISKUSI DALAM PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION PADA SISWA KELAS II SMK KARTIKA II-I MALANG – 02
189. STUDI TENTANG KOSAKATA SERAPAN BAHASA INGGRIS DALAM BAHASA INDONESIA YANG TERDAPAT PADA ARTIKEL EKONOMI JAWA POS – 02
190. TINGKAT KESULITAN MEMBEDAKAN KATA KERJA REGULER DAN IRREGULER (VERBS) DALAM PEMAHAMAN STRUKTUR KALIMAT SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 27 SURABAYA – 03
191. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENULIS KALIMAT BENTUK SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SMEA PAWIYATAN DI SURABAYA – 01
192. ANALISA MATERI WRITING DALAM BUKU TEKS ”LET’S LEARN ENGLISH FOR 2 SLTP” DALAM KAITANNYA DENGAN GBPP 1994 – 02
193. KESULITAN-KESULITAN YANG DIALAMI MAHASISWA DALAM MEMPELAJARI LISTENING I DI LABORATORIUM BAHASA INGGRIS UMPA SURABAYA – 02
194. PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN KARTU KATA PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 02
195. PENGARUH MENDENGARKAN LAGU-LAGU BERBAHASA INGGRIS TERAHADAP PENGUASAAN KOSAKATA SISWA KELAS 2 BOGA SMK NEGERI KEDIRI – 03
196. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN METODE ROLE PLAY TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS I SMU NEGERI 2 KEDIRI – 03
197. ANALISIS KESULITAN PENGGUNAAN KATA KERJA DALAM KALIMAT SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II-I SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 03
198. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE COTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR VOCABULARY KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 12 SURABAYA – 03
199. PENGARUH MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN MENULIS SISWA KELAS II DI SLTP NEGERI 24 SURABAYA – 00
200. HUBUNGAN TINGKAT PENDIDIKAN KELUARGA DENGAN PRESTASI BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA SLTP DHARMA WANITA 17 WONOAYU SIDOARJO – 03
201. ANALISA KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN MODAL AUXILIARIES DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS PADA SISWA KELAS II A SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 02
202. PERBANDINGAN PEMEROLEHAN BAHASA INGGRIS DI TK MELALUI PENGAJARAN DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN LAGU DAN REALIA – 02
203. PENGAJARAN STRUCTURE THE SAMPLE PAST TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 39 SURABAYA – 03
204. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN KLH QUESTION OLEH SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 39 SURABAYA – 03
205. ANALISIS KENDALA SISWA DALAM BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS DI SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 03
206. PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA DILIHAT DARI STATUS SOSIAL EKONOMI KELUARGA DI SLTP 35 SURABAYA – 01
207. ANALISIS NOVEL ”THE SINS OF SARAH” KARYA ANNE STYLES DITINJAU DARI KONFLIK TOKOH UTAMA – 01 (SASTRA)
208. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS DI SEKOLAH PENERBANGAN TNI ANGKATAN LAUT DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MEMBACA BAHASA INGGRIS PADA ANGGOTA BINTARA SKUADRON 900 WING UDARA DI JUANDA SURABAYA – 03
209. STUDI KORELASI ANTARA KEGIATAN EKSTRA KURIKULER BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS III SD DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS DALAM PELAKSANAAN KURIKULUM MUATAN LOKAL BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS IV SD DI SD KRISTEN BETHEL SULUNG 3 SURABAYA – 02
210. PENGGUNAAN ROLE PLAY PADA PENGAJARAN SPEAKING PADA SISWA TINGKAT DASAR DI MECC – 02
211. ANALISIS KESALAHAN-KESALAHAN DALAM KALIMAT PASIF DENGAN PENDEKATAN SURFACE STRATEGY TECONOMY – 01
212. PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY MELALUI READING – 03
213. THE CORRELATION STUDY BETWEEN MOTILATION TO LEARN ENGLISH AND ENGLISH ACHIEVEMENT IN SECOND YEAR STUDENTS OF SMK NEGERI 3 PROBOLINGGO – 01
214. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN ROLE PLAY TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERBICARA BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS I SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 02
215. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY SISWA KELAS I SLTP MU’ALLIMAAT GRESIK – 03
216. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN BENTUK DIRECT SPEECH DAN INDIRECT SPEECH PADA SISWA KELAS I SMU SEJAHTERA SURABAYA – 03
217. ANALISIS KARAKTER “OTHELLO” KARYA WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE – 01
218. HUBUNGAN ANTARA KEMAMPUAN VOCABULARY TERHADAP KETERAMPILAN MENULIS (WRITING) DALAM LAMARAN PEKERJAAN PADA SISWA KELAS II CATURWULAN II SMK DR/ SOETOMO SURABAYA – 02
219. MENGAJAR READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN DIRECT METHOD DI SMU SEJAHTERA I SURABAYA – 02
220. THE USE OF ENGLISH READING MATEMATIS TO INCREASE STUDENTS READING ABILITY – 00
221. HUBUNGAN ANTARA MINAT MENDENGARKAN LAGU-LAGU POP BAHASA INGGRIS TERHADAP HASIL LISTENING SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 12 SURABAYA – 02
222. HUBUNGAN PENGUASAAN PEMAHAMAN WACANA DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENULIS BAGI SISWA KELAS I SMU INTENSIF TARUNA PEMBANGUNAN SURABAYA – 02
223. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN PRESENT CONTONOUS TENSE OLEH SISWA KELAS II SLTP KARTIKA V-I SURABAYA – 02
224. ANALISIS PENGGUNAAN TO BE YANG DISERTAI OLEH VERB DAN NON VERB PADA BUKU LET’S LEARN ENGLISH I (CATURWULAN I) TERBITAN PT. EDUMEDIA – 01
225. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN LKS TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR VOCABULARY PADA SISWA KELAS 2 SMU SEJAHTERA I SURABAYA – 03
226. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR VOCABULARY PADA SISWA KELAS II SD DARUL ULUM KEBONSARI SURABAYA – 03
227. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENULIS SISWA KELAS II SMU SEJAHTERA 2 SURABAYA – 02
228. STUDI TENTANG PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE DISKUSI DAN METODE CERAMAH – 01
229. HAMBATAN PARA SISWA DALAM MEMAHAMI PELAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS KHUSUSNYA DALAM PEMAHAMAN VOCABULARY PADA SISWA-SISWI KELAS II SLTP KRISTEN ALETHEIA SURABAYA – 03
230. ANALISA KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN SIMPLE PAST TENSE DALAM PARAGRAF KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 24 SURABAYA – 03
231. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN SPEAKING DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN TEKNIK DRILLING TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS I DI SLTPN NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 02
232. KORELASI KEMAMPUAN VOCABULARY TERHADAP HASIL BELAJAR READING SISWA KELAS II SMU SEJAHTERA II SURABAYA – 03
233. ANALISA KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN GERUND DALAM KALIMAT PADA SISWA KELAS II-2 DI SMU INTENSIF TARUNA PEMBANGUNAN SURABAYA – 03
234. PENGGUNAAN VERB ING SEBAGAI PROGRESSIVE ATAU GERUND DALAM KALIMAT BAHASA INGGRIS – 01
235. HUBUNGAN PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA DENGAN KEMAMPUAN BERBICARA BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II MTS CAMADAWARU SIDOARJO – 03
236. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION MENGGUNAKAN GAMBAR TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN MEMBACA SISWA KELAS I SMU BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 02
237. STUDI TENTANG KORELASI ANTARA HASIL TES IQ DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA TINGKAT SLTP PADA BIDANG STUDI BAHASA INGGRIS – 02
238. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN STRUCTURE SISWA SMP PGRI 9 SURABAYA – 00
239. ANALISIS PENYEBABA KESULITAN SISWA DALAM BELAJAR READING COMPREHENSION KELAS I-B SMP NEGERI 30 SURABAYA – 00
240. THE DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON THE INTERACTION IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS ON VOCABULARY AT THE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS OF SMK NEGERI 6 SURABAYA – 01
241. ANALISIS KONFLIK TOKO UTAMA NOVEL THE LIE KARYA MARVIN WERLIN DAN MARK WERLIN – 00
242. ANALISIS KESULITAN-KESULITAN SISWA DALAM MENULIS BAHASA INGGRIS DI SMP NEGERI 22 SURABAYA – 01
243. PERBEDAAN ANTARA PENGGUNAAN METODE EGRA DENGAN METODE GTM TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR STRUCTURE PRESENT PERFECT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 24 SURABAYA – 02
244. IMPROVING STUDENTS SPEAKING SKILL BY USING DIALOGUE AT II-4 STUDENTS OF SMU MUHAMMADIYAH 2 SURABAYA – 01
245. ANALISA KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN TANDA BACA DALAM PENULISAN PARAGRAF PADA TINGKAT II SMU NEGERI 2 PASURUAN – 01
246. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN METODE KOMUNIKATIF TERHADAP PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DI KELAS II SLTP KEPANJEN 1 SURABAYA
247. ANALISIS MATERI READING DALAM BUKU PAKET ”COMMUNICATIVE AND LEARNINGFUL ENGLISH FOR SMU 1” KAITANNYA DENGAN KURIKULUM 1994 – 03
248. AN ANALISYS THE LINGUISTIC FORMS USED HAL MAGAZINE INTERN OF SEX AND AGE – 03
249. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN PENDEKATAN KOMUNIKATIF DAN TERJEMAHAN DALAM PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS I SMU BHAYANGKARA 4 WARU SIDOARHO – 03
250. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN BAHASA IBU SEBAGAI BAHASA PENGANTAR TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR READING COMPREHENSION SISWA KELAS I SLTP AL-FURWON DRIYOREJO GRESIK – 03
251. AN ANALISYS OF THE TYPES OF READING TEZT QUESTIONS IN THE ENGLISH TEXT BOOK “WINDOW ON THE WORLD” FOR THE FIRST YEAR OF SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PUBLISHED BY ERLANGGA – 01
252. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR PADA KEMAMPUAN PENGGUNAAN PRESENT PROGRESSIVE TENSE PAA SISWA KELAS II SLTP BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 03
253. KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS I SMA SEJAHTERA II SURABAYA DALAM BERBAHASA INGGRIS – 03
254. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN FLASH CARD TERHADAP PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY DI SLTP NEGERI 30 SURABAYA – 03
255. STUDI PERBANDINGAN ANTARA AFIKS DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS DAN BAHASA INDONESIA – 03
256. PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY MELALUI READING PADA SISWA MADRASAH IBTIDAIYAH BAITURRAHMAN SURABAYA – 02
257. PENGARUH PENGGGUNAAN READING PASSAGE TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 02
258. PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN METODE TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE PADA SISWA TAMAN KANAK-KANAK – 02
259. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN KALIMAT PRESENT PERFECT TENSE SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 03
260. MANFAAT PENGGUNAAN LABORATORIUM BAHASA INGGRIS DALAM PENGJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS PADA SISWA SLTP NEGERI 14 SURABAYA – 02
261. ANALISIS BUTIR SOAL TES SUMATIF SEMESTER GASAL PELAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 12 SURABAYA TAHUN PELAJARAN 2002/2003 – 03
262. STUDI TENTANG PENGGUNAAN METODE DISKUSI DAN TANYA JAWAB TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR READING COMPREHENSION KELAS I SMU KEMALA BHAYANGKARI 4 – 03
263. THE DIFFRENCES OF USING ENGLISH SONGS AND WITHOUR USING ENGLISH SONGS TO BUILD UP STUDENTS VOCABULARY AT THE FIRST YEAR STUDENT AT SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 02
264. KORELASI PENGGUNAAN KOSA KATA DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENGARANG ARGUMENTASI SISWA KELAS VI SD NEGERI RUNGKUT MERANGGAI I/582 SURABAYA – 02
265. ANALISA KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENGGUNAKAN CONDITIONAL SENTENCES PADA SISWA KELAS III SMK NEGERI 3 PROBOLINGGO – 00
266. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PADA PENYUSUNAN ADJECTIVE CLAUSA OLEH SISWA-SISWI KELAS II SMU SEJAHTERA I SURABAYA – 03
267. PENGARUH DORONGAN MORAL DAN DORONGAN MATERIAL ORANG TUA TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 39 SURABAYA – 03
268. HUBUNGAN ANTARA MEMBACA INTENSIF DAN PRESTASI MENULIS BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II SLTP GEMA 45 SURABAYA – 01
269. KORELASI ANTARA PENGUASAAN READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN KEMAMPUAN WRITING SISWA KELAS I SMK PAWIYATAN SURABAYA – 02
270. STUDI TENTANG KESALAHAN-KESALAHAN GRAMATIKAL DAN LEKSIKAL PADA KEGIATAN SPEAKING IV MAHASISWA SEMESTER IV JURUSAN BAHASA INGGRIS UNIVERSITAS PGRI ADI BUANA SURABAYA – 01
271. HUBUNGAN PEMAHAMAN MEMBACA DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENULIS BAGI SISWA KELAS II SLTP TARUNA JASA I SURABAYA – 00
272. ANALISIS KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING KARYAWAN PT. RAPTIM TOUR TERHADAP PERKEMBANGAN PARIWISATA DI JAWA TIMUR – 01
273. TEACHING SPEAKING FOR THE THIRD CLASS STUDENTS OF HOTEL DEPARTMENT IN SMK 17 AGUSTUS 1945 SURABAYA – 01
274. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS MELALUI LAGU-LAGU DENGAN TAPE RECORDER TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN LISTENING PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 03
275. ANALISYS OF THE CONFLICT OF THE MAIN CHARACTER IN OWEN G. ARNO’S DRAMA “THE OTHER PLAYER” – 01 (SASTRA)
276. AN ANALISYS ON THE PLOT AND CHARACTERS IN MARK TWAIN’S NOVEL THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER – 00
277. ANALISIS KESULITAN PENGGUNAAN DEFINITE DAN INDEFINITE ARTICLE TERHADAP PELAJARAN STRUCTURE SISWA KELAS I SMK DHARMA WANITA KEDIRI – 00
278. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN TEKA TEKI SILANG TERHADAP PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA SISWA KELAS II SLTP KEPANJEN I SURABAYA – 03
279. TEACHING STRUCTURE (PRESENT CONTINOUS TENSE) BY DEMONSTRATION TECHNIQUE) – 01
280. PENGARUH PELAJARAN FORMAL TERHADAP PENGUASAAN MATERI PELAJARAN READING SISWA SMU INTENSIF TARUNA PEMBANGUNAN – 02
281. PENGARUH PENGUASAAN TENSES DASAR TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERBICARA BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS V SD AL-KHARIYAH II SURABAYA – 03
282. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN PRESENT TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS III SMP BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 02
283. ANALISA KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN MODAL AUXALIRIES (CAN, MUST, MAY, WILL, SHALL) PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP PGRI I SURABAYA – 02
284. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN LABORATORIUM BAHASA INGGRIS DALAM PENGAJARAN LISTENING TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS II DI SLTP NEGERI 7 SURABAYA – 03
285. ANALISIS NOVEL MOTHER’S BOYS KARYA BERNARD TAYLOK DARI KONFLIK PSIKOLOGI TOKOH UTAMANYA – 02 (SASTRA)
286. PENGARUH SISWA YANG BERORGANISASI DENGAN YANG TIDAK BERORGANISASI DALAM KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING DI SLTP NEGERI I BANGSAL MOJOKERTO – 02
287. ANALISA KESALAHAN DALAM PENEMPATAN HURUF ’S’ DAN ’ES’ UNTUK KATA BENDA JAMAK PADA SISWA KELAS I-A MTS NEGERI LENGKONG NGANJUK – 03
288. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN FLASH CARD DALAM PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY TERHADAP PENINGKATAN PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA KELAS IV PADA SD NEGERI UJUNG VIII/33 SURABAYA – 01
289. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN DIALOG PADA PENGAJARAN SPEAKING PADA SISWA KELAS I SMU SEJAHTERA 2 SURABAYA – 02
290. ANALISIS KESALAHAN DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN SAMPLE PAST TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP PGRI SURABAYA – 01
291. PENGAJARAN VOCABULARY DENGANMENGGUNAKAN MEDIA GAMBAR – 02
292. TEKNIK PENGAJARAN READING SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABYAA – 03
293. PENGAJARAN TPR DALAM MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 35 SURABAYA – 02
294. ANALISYS KARAKTER TOKOH UTAMA ”ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DENISSOVICH” KARYA ALEXANDRE ISA YEVICH SOLZHENITSYN – 03
295. ANALISIS NOVEL ”SEBUAH LORONG DI KOTAKU” KARYA NH. DINI DITINJAU DARI UNSUR INSTRINSIK – 02 (SASTRA)
296. ANALISA KESALAHAN DALAM PENGGUNAAN SIMPLE PAST TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS 2 MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH ASH-FIYAH SURABAYA – 02
297. AT ANALISYS OF THEME PLOT AND ANGEL’S CHARACTER IN ELIZABETH LOWELL’S NOVEL ”A WOMAN WITHOUT LIES” – 01
298. PENGARUH PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERBICARA DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II DI SMK SURABAYA – 01
299. PENGARUH TEKNIK ”DRILL” DALAM AUDIO LINGUAL METHOD DAN ”NON DRILL” TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SPEAKING SISWA KELAS I SLTP KARTIKA V-I SURABAYA – 01
300. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN QUESTION AND ANSWER GAMES TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERBICARA BAHASA INGGRIS SISWAKELAS I SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 02
301. STUDI DESKRIPTIF TENTANG PENGAJARAN KOSA KATA (VOCABULARY) SECARA MEANINGFUL LEARNING KELAS II DI SLTP I TAMAN – 01
302. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN DASAR-DASAR THE SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR SISWA SD KELAS C DI SD I-K IBRAHIM SURABAYA – 02
303. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA AUDIO TAPE RECORDER PADA PENGAJARAN LISTENING SISWA KELAS I SMK NEGERI 3 MALANG – 02
304. STUDI KORELASI ANTARA PENGUASAAN READING COMPREHENSION TERHADAP WRITING SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 00
305. A STUDY ON THE CHARACTERIZATION OF MAIN CHARACTER AS DESCRIBED ON PEARLS BUCK’S NOVEL ”PAVILION OF WOMAN” – 01 (SASTRA)
306. HUBUNGAN KEBIASAAN MEMBACA ENGLISH MAGAZINE DENGAN PRESTASI BELAJAR READING SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 23 SURABAYA – 03
307. THE ANALISYS OF KEENY’S CHARACTER IN ILEBY ELLGENE O’NEILL – 00 (SASTRA)
308. THE STUDY OF FEMINISM SPIRIT MAINTANED BY MADAME WI’S CHARACTER IN PEARL S. BUCK PAVILIUN OF WOMEN – 01 (SASTRA)
309. KEMAMPUAN MEMBENTUK KATA BENDA JAMAK DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS II AK-1 DANKELAS II SK-1 SMK PAWIYATAN SURABAYA – 00
310. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR DALAM PENGAJARAN KOSA KATA TERHADAP PRESTASI SISWA-SISWI LAMBAR BELAJAR KELAS V-A SD KHUSUS GALUH HANDAYANI (MARIA MONTES SORI) SURABAYA – 00
311. ANALISIS KESALAHAN PENGGUNAAN SIMPLE TENSE, SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE AND SIMPLE PAST TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 03
312. PENGARUH MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP PENGAJARAN PROGRESIVVE TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II DI SLTP NEGERI 23 SURABAYA – 01
313. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN TEXT BOOK DAN MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN PEMAHAMAN PRESENT CONTINOUS TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 24 SURABAYA – 01
314. STUDI KORELASI ANTARA PRESTASI MATA PELAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS TERHADAP PRESTASI MATA PELAJARAN KOMPUTER BAGI SISWA KELAS II JURUSAN ADMINISTRASI PERKANTORAN DI SMK NEGERI 10 SURABAYA – 01
315. KEMAMPUAN MEMBUAT KALIMAT SEDERHANA SISWA KELAS V SD NEGERI KREMBANGAN UTARA I/56 SURABAYA – 03
316. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN KOSA KATA BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MEDIA FLASH CARD PADA SISWA KELAS I CAWU I SLTP BARUNAWATI SURABAYA – 02
317. KECERDASAN EMOSIONAL TOKOH UTAMA HEAT CLIFF DALAM NOVEL WUTEHRING HEIGHTS DITINJAU DARI PANDANGAN DANIEL GOLEMAN – 03
318. THE INTERFERENCE OF INDONESIA IN THE PROCESS OF SPEAKING ENGLISH FOR THE FRONT OFFICE STAFF OF SOMERSET SURABAYA HOTEL AND SERVICED RESIDENDE – 02
319. HUBUNGAN PENGUASAAN TENSES DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENULIS BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 39 SURABAYA – 02
320. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENGUBAH BENTUK TUNGGAL KE BENTUK JAMAK TAK BERATURAN PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP YPM 2 SUKODONO SIDOARJO – 03
321. PENGAJARAN SPEAKING DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MEDIA FLASH CARD KELAS II SD KURNIA INDAH SURABAYA – 03
322. PENGARUH PENGAJARAN READING COMPREHENSION DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN KAMUS BAHASA INGGRIS TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR READING SISWA KELAS I SMK NEGERI 3 KEDIRI – 03
323. PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS (KOSA KATA) PADA SISWA SD KELAS IV DI WILAYAH DEPDIKBUD KEC. KRIAN – 00
324. ANALISIS KESALAHAN SISWA DALAM MENTRANSFORMASIKAN KALIMAT AKTIF MENJADI PASIF PADA SISWA KELAS II SMK INDO BARUNA SURABAYA – 02
325. ANALISIS KESALAHAN DALAM PENGGUNAAN MODAL CAIN, COULD, WILL, WOULD, MAY, MIGHT, MUST, WITH, PERFECT INFINITE PADA SISWA SMK MADA 2 KELAS II AKUNTANSI DI BERBEK WARU, SIDOARJO – 03
326. HUBUNGAN PENGUASAAN TENSES DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MENULIS BAHASA INGGRIS SISWA KELAS I SLTP NEGERI 21 SURABAYA – 03
327. ANALISIS KONFLIK TOKOH-TOKOH UTAMA DALAM NOVEL THE QUEEN OF DEATH – 00
328. BENTUK PENGAJARAN SPEAKING MELALUI MEDIA GAMBAR PADA SISWA SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 00
329. PROFIL DOSEN PENGAJARAN MATA KULIAH SPEAKING DI AKADEMI TEKNIK DAN KESELAMATAN PENERBANGAN SURABAYA – 03
330. STUDI DESKRIPTIF TENTANG PENGAJARAN BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MEDIA GAMBAR PADA SD NEGERI KEDUNG DORO VI/311 SURABAYA – 03
331. KESALAHAN MENULIS SURAT LAMARAN PEKERJAAN DALAM BAHASA INGGRIS BAGI SISWA KELAS III SK-3 JURUSAN SEKRETARIS DI SMK NEGERI 10 SURABAYA – 01
332. PENGARUH PENGUASAAN KOSA KATA TERAHDAP KEMAMPUAN BERBICARA BAHASA INGGRIS PADA SISWA KELAS II SLTP NEGERI 17 SURABAYA – 03
333. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN METODE KOMUNIKATIF TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN SPEAKING SISWA KELAS III DI SMU KARTIKA V SURABAYA – 01
334. KORELASI MINAT BACA DENGAN KEMAMPUAN MEMBACA TEKS BAHASA INGGRIS PADA SISWA KELAS I SLTP JALAN JAWA SURABAYA – 01
335. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN MEDIA GAMBAR TERHADAP HASIL PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY DI SD NEGERI SUMOKERTO IV/137 SURABAYA – 00
336. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PENGUASAAN VOCABULARY DENGAN KEMAMPUAN WRITING PADA SISWA KELAS III SLTP NEGERI 23 SURABAYA – 01
337. ANALISIS KESALAHAN STRUKTUR KALIMAT PASIF MAHASISWA SEMESTER VI JURUSAN BAHASA INGGRIS KELAS F TAHUN 2000 UNIVERSITAS PGRI ADI BUANA SURABAYA – 03
338. PENGAJARAN WRITING PADA SISWA KELAS II KARTIKA V-I SLTP SURABAYA – 01
339. LOVE AFFAIR IN WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S AMID SUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM: A STRUCTURAL ANALISYS ABOUT ITS MAJOR CHARACTERS – 04
340. ERROR ANALISYS ON THE USE OF CAUSATIVE CONSTRUCTION DONE BY THE SECOND YEAR STUDENT OF SMU NEGERI 3 PURWOKERTO IN 1997 – 98
341. AN ANALISYS OF ERRORS ON PASSIVE VOICE DONE BY THE FOURTH SEMESTER STUDENTS OF SMEA SWADAYA KLATEN 1993/1994 SYINTACTIC ERROR ANALISYS – 95
342. CONSTRACTIVE ANALISYS BETWEEN ENGLISH AN INDONESIAN PREPOSITIONS OF PLACE – 01
343. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON VOCABULARY MASTERU OF THE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS OF SLTP I WONOSARI YOGYAKARTA IN 2000 – 01
344. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DRILL AND LECTURE TECHNIQUES IN TEACHING PREPOSITIONS TO THE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS OF SMK KRISTEN 4 KLATEN IN 2001 – 01
345. CONSTRACTIVE ANALISYS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY – 01
346. A CORRELATION STUDY BETWEEN ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN ADVERBS OF MANNER AND READING COMPREHENSION OF THE SECOND YEAR STUDENTS OF SLTP PGRI 4 PEDAN – 02
347. A STUDY OF THE ENGLISH VERBALIZATION – 03
348. A CONSTRACTIVE ANALISYS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN COMMUNICATIVE EXPRESSIONS – 03
349. CONSTRACTIVE ANALISYS BETWEEN ENGLISH AND INDONESIAN DERIVATIONS FORMING NOUN – 03
350. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ENGLISH TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS OF CLASS 2 BOGA I AT SMK NEGERI I SEWON BANTUL – 04
351. THE IMPROVEMENT OF PRODUCT QUALITY BASED ON COST QUALITY ANALISYS AND IMPLEMENTATION OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM) (CASE STUDY IN PT. ASELI DAGADU DJOGDJA) – 04
352. PENGARUH PENGGUNA MEDIA GAMBAR DALAM PENGAJARAN PRESENT CONTINOUS TENSE PADA SISWA KELAS II MTS MAULANA MALIK IBRAHIM – 02
353. THE ABILITY OF STUDENTS IN USING TRANSITIONAL DEVICES IN SENTENCE CONSTRUCTION – 92
354. EVALUATION ON ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES (ESP) TEXT BOOK FOR NURSING ENTITLED ACTIVE ENGLISH FPR NURSES BY RACHMAT HIDAYAT AND SHINTA SILASWATI – 04
355. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF READIBILITY LEVEL OF EDITORIAL COLOUMN IN THE JAKARTA POST DAILY ISSUE IN FEBRUARY-MARCH 1996 – 97
356. A STUDY ON ENGLISH ADJECTIVE PHRASES IN THE FASHION AND STYLE ARTICLES OF NEW YORK TIMES PUBLISHED IN DECEMBER 2002 AND JANUARY 2003 – 02
357. THE ASPECT OF NATURALISM IN STEPEHEN CRANE’S MAGGIE A GRIL STREET CHARACTERIZATION AND THEME – 98
358. FAIRUELS IN BUILDING LOVE RELATIONSHIP AMONG THE MAJOR CHARACTERS IN ERNEST HEMING WAYS THE SUN ALSO RISES – 99
359. THE CRITICISM ON THE IMPERIALISM IN CONRAD’S HEART OF DARK A CHARACTERS AND SETTING STUDY – 02
360. THE SOCIAL CONDITIONS OF BRITAIN DURING THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION AND ITS SIGNIFICANCES TOWARD THE MAIN CHARACTERS AS REVLED IN H.G. WELLS THE TIME MACHINE – 05
361. CONSTRUCTIVIST READING MODELS (CRM) FOR THE STUDENTS OF THE ENGLISH EDUCATION STUDY PROGRAM OF WIDYA MANDIRA CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY KUPANG EAST NUSA TENGGARA PROVINCE – 06
362. IDEALISM AND REALITY IN ARTHUR MILER’S BEATH OF A SALESMAN – 00
363. THE EFFECT OF LOBE AS MORAL TEACHING IN DOHERTY’S DEAR BODY – 05
364. THE RELATIONSHIP OF PLOT, MAIN CHARACTERS, SETTING AND THEME AS SEEN IN STEPEHEN CRANE’S THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE – 03
365. THE DECISION MAKING PROCESS IN THE PUBLIC SECTOT, FROM A GENDER PERSPECTIVE “THE CASE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIO AND CULTURE IN DIY INDONESIA” – 00
366. THE INFLUENCE OF THE SOCIAL CONDITION TOWARD GERALD ARBUTHNOT PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT AS SEEN IN OSCAR WILDE’S A WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE – 02
367. A COMPARATIVE STUDY THE EFFECTIVENESS OF USING PICTURES AND … IN STORY TELLING IN TEACHING ENGLISH VOCABULARY IN THE 4TH GRADE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN SD NEGERI DEMANGAN 2005/2006 ACADEMIC YEAR – 06
368. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ORACY IN PANGUDI LUHUR BINTANG LAUT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL : A CASE STUDY – 06
369. THE EXISTANCE OF FIVE PRINCIPLES IN A COMMUNICATIVE EXERCISE TIPE IN TWO MATERIAL SOURCES (A DOCUMENTARY ANALISYS OF JOANA KARMEL’S 96 GAMES FOR BEGINNERS IN ESL AND HAD FIELD’S ELEMENTARY COMMUNICATION GAMES) –
370. A STUDY ON USAGE FREQUENCY OF FUTURE FORMS SHOWING PLANS IN THREE BRITISH PLAYS – 02
371. A984 : A BIOGRAPICHAL ANALISYS – 89
372. MORALITY AND THE ROLE OF RELIGION IN ARTHUR MILLER’S THE CRUCIBLE – 04
373. THE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS ABILITY AND THEIR DIFFICULTIES I FORMING SIMPLE PRESENT AND SIMPLE PAST TENSE IN ENGLISH SENTENCES AT MAN WONOSARI – 93
374. PENGAJARAN KOSRESPONDENSI BAHASA INGGRIS DI SMEA MUHAMMADIYAH JATINOM KLATEN – 93
375. THE SOCIO-HISTORICAL CRITISM TOWARD THE 1920’S AMERICAN SOCIETY SEEN THROUGH GATSBY’S LIFE IN FITZGERALD’S THE GREAT GATSBY – 02
376. JOHN NASH’S STRUGGLE AGAINTS SCCHIZOPHRANIA AS SEEN IN SYLVIA NASAR’S A BEAUTIFUL MINE – 06
377. THE INFLUENCE OF PARTS OF SPEECH MASTERY ON THE STUDENT ABILITY IN CONSTRUCTING ENGLISH SENTENCES . A CASE STUDY OF THE SECOND GRADE OF SLTPN I WEDI KLATEN IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR OF 2002/2003 – 03
378. THE APPLICATION OF COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH IN TEACHING READING TO THE STUDENTS AT SMPN I IMOGIRI IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR OF 2004/2005- 04
379. THE PSICOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE MAIN CHARACTER QUASI MODE IN …
380. ENRICHING VOCABULARY THROUGH … POEMS
381. THE FEMINIST SIDE OF TESS IN TESS OF THE D’URBERYLLES- 03
382. INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF PRETERM BIRTH IN PURWOKERTO DISTRICT – 07
383. COMPARATIVE ANALISYS OF LEXICOGRAMATICAL STRUCTURE OF REVIEW AND DISCUSSION TEXT FOUND IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL – 07
384. THE BAD IMPACT OF POVERTY IN ENGLAND’S INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION TOWARD CHILDREN AS FEFLE CTEN IN CHARLES DICKEN’S OLIVER TWIST – 07
385. SOCIAL ISSUE OF EARLY TWENTIEH CENTURY IN AMERICA SOCIETY REVEALED THROUGH THE MAJOR CHARACTER IN FAULKNER’S AS I LAY DYING – 07
386. IDENTIFICATION OF CONTRAINTS OF THE ENGLISH FOR TOURISM (EFT) TEACHING LEARNING AND THE TEACHER’S EFFORT TO OVERCOME THEM – 07